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Dyess, Abilene firefighters train together to keep blaze under control

U.S. Air Force firefighters from the 7th Civil Engineer Squadron participate in live fire training exercise April 2, 2014, at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas. Teams from the Dyess Fire Department and Abilene Regional Airport Fire Department demonstrated various hose and firefighting procedures while engaging the controlled blaze. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kia Atkins/Released)

U.S. Air Force firefighters from the 7th Civil Engineer Squadron participate in live fire training exercise April 2, 2014, at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas. Teams from the Dyess Fire Department and Abilene Regional Airport Fire Department demonstrated various hose and firefighting procedures while engaging the controlled blaze. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kia Atkins/Released)

U.S. Air Force firefighters from the 7th Civil Engineer Squadron participate in live fire training exercise April 2, 2014, at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas. Teams from the Dyess Fire Department and Abilene Regional Airport Fire Department demonstrated various hose and firefighting procedures while engaging the controlled blaze. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kia Atkins/Released)

U.S. Air Force firefighters from the 7th Civil Engineer Squadron participate in live fire training exercise April 2, 2014, at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas. Teams from the Dyess Fire Department and Abilene Regional Airport Fire Department demonstrated various hose and firefighting procedures while engaging the controlled blaze. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kia Atkins/Released)

U.S. Air Force firefighters from the 7th Civil Engineer Squadron spray water onto a fire during a live fire training exercise April 2, 2014, at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas. In addition to wearing their fire proximity suits, firefighters must also wear self-contained breathing apparatus’ that provide a source of clean oxygen, enabling them to work in the presence of smoke or other super-heated gases.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kia Atkins/Released)

U.S. Air Force firefighters from the 7th Civil Engineer Squadron spray water onto a fire during a live fire training exercise April 2, 2014, at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas. In addition to wearing their fire proximity suits, firefighters must also wear self-contained breathing apparatus’ that provide a source of clean oxygen, enabling them to work in the presence of smoke or other super-heated gases. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kia Atkins/Released)

Firefighters from the 7th Civil Engineer Squadron and the Abilene Regional Airport Fire Department extinguish flames during a live fire training exercise April 2, 2014, at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas. The silver fire proximity suits that firefighters wear are manufactured from vacuum-deposited aluminized materials that designed to reflect high radiant heat produced by fire. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kia Atkins/Released)

Firefighters from the 7th Civil Engineer Squadron and the Abilene Regional Airport Fire Department extinguish flames during a live fire training exercise April 2, 2014, at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas. The silver fire proximity suits that firefighters wear are manufactured from vacuum-deposited aluminized materials that designed to reflect high radiant heat produced by fire. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kia Atkins/Released)

Firefighters from the 7th Civil Engineer Squadron and the Abilene Regional Airport Fire Department extinguish flames during a live fire training exercise April 2, 2014, at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas. The silver fire proximity suits that firefighters wear are manufactured from vacuum-deposited aluminized materials that designed to reflect high radiant heat produced by fire. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kia Atkins/Released)

Firefighters from the 7th Civil Engineer Squadron and the Abilene Regional Airport Fire Department extinguish flames during a live fire training exercise April 2, 2014, at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas. The silver fire proximity suits that firefighters wear are manufactured from vacuum-deposited aluminized materials that designed to reflect high radiant heat produced by fire. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kia Atkins/Released)

A U.S. Air Force firefighter from the 7th Civil Engineer Squadron ignites jet fuel during live fire training exercise April 2, 2014, at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas. The silver suits that firefighters wear are called fire proximity suits, which are designed to protect them from fire and extreme heat, like the heat encountered during aircraft fires. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kia Atkins/Released)

A U.S. Air Force firefighter from the 7th Civil Engineer Squadron ignites jet fuel during live fire training exercise April 2, 2014, at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas. The silver suits that firefighters wear are called fire proximity suits, which are designed to protect them from fire and extreme heat, like the heat encountered during aircraft fires. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kia Atkins/Released)

Firefighters from the 7th Civil Engineer Squadron and the Abilene Fire Department participate in live fire training exercise April 2, 2014, at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas. The firefighters also used foam to suppress the fire. Foam cools the fire and coats the fuel, preventing its contact with oxygen, resulting in suppression of the combustion. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kia Atkins/Released)

Firefighters from the 7th Civil Engineer Squadron and the Abilene Fire Department participate in live fire training exercise April 2, 2014, at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas. The firefighters also used foam to suppress the fire. Foam cools the fire and coats the fuel, preventing its contact with oxygen, resulting in suppression of the combustion. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kia Atkins/Released)

Firefighters from the Abilene Regional Airport Fire Department extinguish a fire during live fire training exercise April 2, 2014, at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas. Upon ignition, jet fuel starts to burn at 410 degrees Fahrenheit and can reach temperatures over 1,800 degrees. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kia Atkins/Released)

Firefighters from the Abilene Regional Airport Fire Department extinguish a fire during live fire training exercise April 2, 2014, at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas. Upon ignition, jet fuel starts to burn at 410 degrees Fahrenheit and can reach temperatures over 1,800 degrees. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kia Atkins/Released)

Firefighters from the Abilene Regional Airport Fire department spray water onto a fire during a live fire training exercise April 2, 2014 at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas. The usual working pressure of a fire hose can vary between 490 to 1,204 pounds per square inch. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kia Atkins/Released)

Firefighters from the Abilene Regional Airport Fire department spray water onto a fire during a live fire training exercise April 2, 2014 at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas. The usual working pressure of a fire hose can vary between 490 to 1,204 pounds per square inch. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kia Atkins/Released)

U.S. Air Force firefighters from the 7th Civil Engineer Squadron light a fire during a live fire training exercise April 2, 2014, at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas. During this live fire training, jet fuel was used to simulate the same type of fire that firefighters would encounter during an actual aircraft emergency.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kia Atkins/Released)
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U.S. Air Force firefighters from the 7th Civil Engineer Squadron light a fire during a live fire training exercise April 2, 2014, at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas. During this live fire training, jet fuel was used to simulate the same type of fire that firefighters would encounter during an actual aircraft emergency. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kia Atkins/Released)

DYESS AIR FORCE BASE, Texas -- Firefighters from the 7th Civil Engineer Squadron and Abilene Airport Fire Department participated in live fire training here April 2 and 3.

The purpose of live fire training is to evaluate and improve firefighting capabilities on various types of aircraft fires.

"In this live fire training, we use actual jet fuel, whereas a lot of other bases use propane, which doesn't present the same challenges," said Floyd Jones, 7th CES deputy fire chief.

The firefighters from the 7th CES were completing their mandatory bi-annual training in conjunction with the Abilene Airport Fire Department's yearly fire certifications required by the Federal Aviation Association.

"Our guys will be fighting live fuel today, and if they mess up...they get burned," Jones said. "It's not just a simulated fire, it's a real fire. The Air Force has seen that Airmen deployed from bases who use propane instead of jet fuel in their firefighting training do not have as good of techniques as the Airmen who do. It's the same as anything: hands-on training just makes you better at your job."

Instead of having to go to Dallas-Fort Worth for their yearly certifications, the Abilene Airport Fire Department is able to perform their training on base with the Dyess Fire Department. Abilene Airport purchases the fuel for these yearly certifications. By not having to make the commute to Dallas; it saves the taxpayers of Abilene roughly $15,000 to $20,000 a year.

"I believe that doing this fire training with the Abilene Airport Fire Department, it makes us stronger as a community," Jones said. "We have a mutual aid agreement with the Abilene Airport and City of Abilene Fire Departments that if an accident happens at the airport or here on base we can all respond to them. The interoperability between us becomes a lot better, because we can communicate better. They know what our guys do; we know what their truck does, so it just makes all three departments better."