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ACC takes combat search, rescue assets under wing

Pararescuemen from the 306th and 48th Rescue Squadrons fast-rope from an HH-60G Pave Hawk helicopter to retrieve "wounded hostages" during a combined training exercise at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz. Air Combat Command took administrative control of select Air Force combat search and rescue assets from Air Force Special Operations Command April 3 as part of a realignment announced in February. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Veronica Pierce)

Pararescuemen from the 306th and 48th Rescue Squadrons fast-rope from an HH-60G Pave Hawk helicopter to retrieve "wounded hostages" during a combined training exercise at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz. Air Combat Command took administrative control of select Air Force combat search and rescue assets from Air Force Special Operations Command April 3 as part of a realignment announced in February. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Veronica Pierce)

LANGLEY AIR FORCE BASE, Va. (AFPN) -- Air Combat Command took administrative control of select Air Force combat search and rescue assets from Air Force Special Operations Command April 3 as part of a realignment announced in February.

The transfer ensures the Air Force core competency of combat search and rescue, or CSAR, is directly linked to the combat air forces and the personnel they support. This consolidates the management of limited Air Force resources and provides a clearer presentation of force in theater. Under ACC, CSAR assets can be mobilized faster during a national crisis, integrated into combat training and tasked to support all air and space expeditionary force rotations, ACC officials said.

Moving the CSAR mission under ACC will be completely transparent to the warfighter. They will continue, as before, to gain CSAR capability from the owning major command.

The transfer will affect most active-duty operational HC-130s, HH-60 Pave Hawks and most combat rescue officers and pararescuemen, as well as the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center at Langley Air Force Base, Va. Units transferred from AFSOC to ACC will not relocate.

In addition, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units will remain administratively controlled by Air Force Reserve Command and their respective states, but will be gained by ACC or Pacific Air Forces when fully mobilized.

Active-duty units affected by the transfer are the 347th Rescue Wing at Moody AFB, Ga., and all subordinate units; the 563rd Rescue Group at Davis-Monthan AFB, Ariz., and all subordinate units; the HH-60G Combined Test Force at Nellis AFB, Nev.; and the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center at Langley AFB, Va.

Air Force Reserve Command units affected are the 920th Rescue Wing at Patrick AFB, Fla., and the 943rd Rescue Group at Davis-Monthan, Ariz., and its subordinate squadron, the 304th Rescue Squadron at Portland International Airport, Ore.

Affected Air National Guard units are the 106th Rescue Wing at Gabreski Field, N.Y., and the 129th RQW at Moffett Field, Calif.

CSAR assets and personnel assigned to PACAF and U.S. Air Forces Europe will not be affected by the transfer.

Further actions associated with the transfer, including a routine site visit and funding actions, will occur over the next few months. ACC, with assistance from AFSOC, will complete the programmatic actions associated with the transfer by October.

(Courtesy of Air Combat Command News Service)