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Airmen complete Crashed Damaged Disabled Aircraft Recovery training

Airmen complete Crashed Damaged Disabled Aircraft Recovery training

U.S. Air Force Airmen prepare to lift a P-80 Shooting Star aircraft during a Crashed Damaged Disabled Aircraft Recovery training scenario at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas, June 12, 2019. Dyess Airmen provide the CDDAR support during real-world scenarios if an aircraft becomes damaged or disabled to help it become mission ready as quickly as possible. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. David Owsianka)

Airmen complete Crashed Damaged Disabled Aircraft Recovery training

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Cody Deel, 7th Equipment Maintenance Squadron repair and reclamation craftsman, right, informs Airmen on how to effectively use a grip hoist when lifting an aircraft during a Crashed Damaged Disabled Aircraft Recovery training scenario at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas, June 12, 2019. The training helped the Airmen maintain and improve their recovery response skillsets while working with different base agencies. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. David Owsianka)

Airmen complete Crashed Damaged Disabled Aircraft Recovery training

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Ellery Lopez, 489th Maintenance Squadron repair and reclamation craftsman, holds onto a fuselage sling prior to an aircraft being lifted during a Crashed Damaged Disabled Aircraft Recovery training scenario at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas, June 12, 2019. CDDAR skills are used when Airmen need to safely and expeditiously recover crashed or damaged aircraft using specialized equipment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. David Owsianka)

Airmen complete Crashed Damaged Disabled Aircraft Recovery training

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Cody Deel, 7th Equipment Maintenance Squadron repair and reclamation craftsman, signals to stop lifting an aircraft during a Crashed Damaged Disabled Aircraft Recovery training scenario at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas, June 12, 2019. The event began with academic instruction training, then transitioned to the team using a crane with a fuselage sling to lift the nose of an aircraft off the ground. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. David Owsianka)

Airmen complete Crashed Damaged Disabled Aircraft Recovery training

U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Anthony Hurst, 7th Equipment Maintenance Squadron repair and reclamation section chief, removes a fuselage sling from a crane’s hook during a Crashed Damaged Disabled Aircraft Recovery training scenario at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas, June 12, 2019. The sling was used to lift the aircraft nose off the ground during aircraft crash recovery operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. David Owsianka)

Airmen complete Crashed Damaged Disabled Aircraft Recovery training

U.S. Air Force Airmen remove a fuselage sling from the P-80 Shooting Star aircraft during a Crashed Damaged Disabled Aircraft Recovery training scenario at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas, June 12, 2019. Airmen from the 7th Equipment Maintenance Squadron, 489th Maintenance Squadron and 7th Civil Engineer Squadron worked together during this scenario to prepare them to effectively respond to an aircraft crash recovery operation. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. David Owsianka)

Airmen complete Crashed Damaged Disabled Aircraft Recovery training

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Ellery Lopez, 489th Maintenance Squadron repair and reclamation craftsman, tightens a bolt on a fuselage sling after completing a Crashed Damaged Disabled Aircraft Recovery training scenario at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas, June 12, 2019. The sling is used to lift the nose of an aircraft off the ground during any training or real-world scenario that may arise when an aircraft is damaged or disabled to provide any repairs to the front end of the aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. David Owsianka)

Dyess Air Force Base, Texas -- U.S. Air Force Airmen prepare to lift a P-80 Shooting Star aircraft during a Crashed Damaged Disabled Aircraft Recovery training scenario at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas, June 12, 2019. Dyess Airmen provide the CDDAR support during real-world scenarios if an aircraft becomes damaged or disabled to help it become mission ready as quickly as possible. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. David Owsianka)