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October: domestic violence awareness month

October: domestic violence awareness month

October is observed as National Domestic Violence Awareness Month. The observance serves to educate communities, individuals, couples and families about the Family Advocacy Program services and other community resources that can help prevent, raise awareness of community responsibility, and inform the community of the many ways to report domestic abuse. (Courtesy photo)

October: domestic violence awareness month

October is recognized as the National Domestic Violence Awareness Month. There are many resources and avenues for victims of domestic abuse. While there are multiple non-military support options, such as the National Domestic Violence Hotline (800-799-7233), Dyess’ Family Advocacy Program is also available for military members and their families (325-696-5380).

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Since 1981, October has been National Domestic Violence Awareness Month. The observance serves to educate communities, individuals, couples and families about the Family Advocacy Program services and other community resources that can help prevent, raise awareness of community responsibility, and inform the community of the many ways to report domestic abuse.

Just as public health issues like influenza are preventable, so too is domestic violence. Every October, DVAM is observed because it is just as much of a public health issue that can be prevented with the help of all members of the community.

Everyone can strengthen their family and their community by understanding what domestic violence is and how everyone has a part in preventing it.

There is a multitude of situations that people can look out for to keep themselves safe. Intimate Partner Violence is one of the circumstances that people can fall into.

Intimate Partner Violence

Persons with certain risk factors are more likely to become perpetrators or victims of domestic violence, also known as intimate partner violence (IPV). Those risk factors can contribute to IPV but might not be direct causes. Not everyone who is identified as “at risk” becomes involved in violence, but being aware of the risks can help identify situations of IPV.

Some risk factors for IPV victimization and perpetration are the same, while others are associated with one another. For example, childhood physical or sexual victimization is a risk factor for future IPV perpetration and victimization.

A combination of individual, relational, community, and societal factors contribute to the risk of becoming an IPV perpetrator or victim. Understanding these multilevel factors can help identify various opportunities for prevention.

To learn more about IPV risk and protective factors and how to identify them, click the link below.

Intimate Partner Violence: Risk and Protective Factors

Domestic violence can happen within any relationship, and those connected to the military are no exception.

How to Help Service-Connected Victims of Domestic Abuse

Anyone can be a victim of domestic abuse, including friends, relatives, neighbor or co-workers. Military members and their families can also be victims of domestic abuse, and it is important for everyone and the community around them to understand the resources available to help them.

According to the Military OneSource website, Abuse is often silent and can be embarrassing and frightening for victims; when they are unable to reach out for help, it is up to the community around them to help. If you ever feel a victim is in immediate danger, get help right away.

To learn more about the warning signs of domestic abuse and how to help service-connected victims, click the link below.

How to Help Service-Connected Victims of Domestic Abuse

Being able to identify signs of domestic abuse is important, but it’s also important to know what resources are available to victims and those trying to help.

How to Find Help Through the Family Advocacy Program

There are many resources and avenues for victims of domestic abuse. While there are multiple non-military support options, such as the National Domestic Violence Hotline (800-799-7233), Dyess’ Family Advocacy Program is also available for military members and their families (325-696-5380).

No one deserves to be abused. Asking for help can be the hardest thing to do for a victim of domestic violence, but there are resources available to help them.

To learn more about available resources for domestic abuse victims, click the link below.

Domestic Abuse and How to Find Help Through the Family Advocacy Program

Though October is known as the month to highlight domestic violence signs, taking the time to evaluate current relationships to help keep them strong and healthy. Jealousy is one such issue commonly found in romantic partnerships.

Understanding Jealousy, Preserving Trust: Keeping Your Relationship Strong

From time to time, it is completely normal to feel a little jealous, even in the healthiest of relationships with a partner. Whether it is due to the fact that a partner seems more devoted to work or hobbies, or if a former love interest comes up in a conversation, it is normal to feel a little jealous.

If that little bit of jealousy starts to turn into a consistent and powerful drain on the relationship and the emotions of one or both people involved, however, there might be a serious problem needing attention and care.

To learn more about jealousy and how it can affect relationships, click the link below.

Understanding Jealousy, Preserving Trust: Keeping Your Relationship Strong

Jealousy is only one of many challenges in a relationship, which takes effort and commitment to make work properly.

Making Relationships Work

Real romance isn’t as easy as it’s made out to be in popular media. Healthy relationships take work, and dating or marriage within the military is no exception. Everyone deserves to feel safe and nurtured by their partner.

Long-lasting relationships are built on trust, respect and communication. Every couple experiences problems. Couples who resolve conflicts respectfully can often work through them and come away even stronger.

Sometimes conflict cannot be resolved and the relationship will end. No matter how difficult or hurtful the situation, resorting to violence will only make matters worse.

To learn more about available resources for strengthening and understanding how to make intimate relationships work, click the link below.

Making Relationships Work

Even though the month of October highlights domestic violence, it’s important to remember that domestic violence can happen to anyone at any time and everyone is part of the solution to try and stop it from happening. If you or someone you know is dealing with domestic violence, please call the National Domestic Violence Hotline (800-799-7233) or Dyess’ Family Advocacy Program (325-696-5380) to get the help that’s needed.