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B-1s provide close air support during joint training exercise
U.S. Air Force and U.S. Army Joint Terminal Attack Controllers (JTACs) defend their position while directing close air support from Dyess Air Force Base, Texas, B-1 Bombers during a joint training exercise May 1, 2013, near Snyder, Texas. The exercise was conducted to prepare B-1 aircrews for future contingency operations and to keep JTACs proficient with their combat skills. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Richard Ebensberger/Released)
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B-1s provide close air support during joint training exercise

Posted 5/6/2013   Updated 5/7/2013 Email story   Print story

    


by Staff Sgt. Richard Ebensberger
7th Bomb Wing Public Affairs


5/6/2013 - DYESS AIR FORCE BASE, Texas -- Aircrews from 9th Bomb Squadron and 77th Weapons Squadron partnered with Joint Terminal Attack Controllers from Fort Sill, Okla., during a joint training exercise held April 29 through May 3 near Snyder, Texas.

The exercise was conducted to prepare B-1 aircrews for future contingency operations and to keep JTACs proficient with their combat skills.

JTACs are highly skilled military personnel who, from a forward position through radio communication, direct combat aircraft engaged in close air support operations against lawful targets and combatants.

The exercise was composed of multiple realistic scenarios consisting of both day and night operations where JTACs on the ground directed close air support and precision attacks from Dyess B-1s against simulated high-value targets attempting to evade detection and capture.

Training scenarios included Dyess personnel portraying insurgents planting Improvised Explosive Devices, or IEDs, along dirt roads to see if B-1 crews could locate them, report their behavior and conduct simulated air strikes against their positions.

B-1s were also directed to follow moving vehicle targets, giving aircrews a chance to test the aircraft's recent Sniper Advanced Targeting Pod-Sensor Enhancement modification.

Throughout the simulated enemy engagements, JTACs were required to defend their position against enemy aggressors while maintaining contact and directing aircraft overhead.

"This training is vital to our preparation to support future contingency operations," said Capt. Thomas White, 9th Bomb Squadron. "Each scenario was designed to be as realistic as possible, challenging the aircrews to think and react to each evolving situation. This type of training is just like it would happen down range."



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